Bolstridge.info a One-Name-Study Database
The Bolstridge One-name-study
First Name:  Last Name: 
[Advanced Search]  [Surnames]

Notes


Matches 101 to 150 of 2,560

      «Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ... 52» Next»

 #   Notes   Linked to 
101

Norman Dudley transcribes this entry as Francis Bulstrode and Jane Ashmore but I am not convinced. 
Family F170
 
102

Not in 1900 Census one child listed dead !! 
Bolstridge, Arthur William (I708)
 
103

Note : - Ann Stead was Maria's Mother's Step Sister 
Family F1342
 
104

Note by le Neve in Visitation of Buckinghamshire 1634 Bulstrode of Upton
Regarding Margaret Relict of Edward Bulstrode

Quaere if not daughter of ..... Brent widdow of John Ashfield. She was the relict of Edward Bulstrode of Hugeley Bulstrode and by him had a daughter Cecely 2nd wife of Sir Alexander son and heir of Sir Thomas Unton of Wadley in Berks Knight and mother of Sir Edward etc
The articles in Celeley's Marriage dated 14 and 16 July 25 H 8 Between Sir Thomas Unton father of Alexander and Margaret widdow of Edward Bulstrode Esquire 
Family F771
 
105

Note Mary Ann Wilson formally Bolstridge her aunt was a Witness. 
Family F874
 
106

Nottingham, St. Nicholas
The Parish
St. Nicholas' Parish averages about 500 yards in length and 250 in breadth. It is bounded on the west by Brewhouse Yard, the castle wall, Standard Hill, the General infirmary and Park Row; and on the north by Chapel Bar, Angel Row and beastmarket Hill; whence its boundary, including the greater part of Friar Lane, passes in an irregular line behind the Friends' Meeting House and Independent Chapel, across Castle Gate to Greyfriargate, down which it passes to the Leen, which forms the southern limit of the parish.Its principal streets are Castle Gate, Houndsgate, Park Street, Rutland Street, St. James' Street, Mount Street and Park Row. It has its parish church, several chapels and other public buildings, one of which is Bromley House.

The Church
St. Nicholas' Church is a neat, brick edifice ornamented with stone, and like Saint Peter's, shaded by a number of trees. It occupies a pleasant situation on the south side of Castlegate, whence its large burial ground extends to Chesterfield Street and Rosemary Lane. The building was commenced in 1671, and finished in 1678, on the site of an ancient fabric which was destroyed in 1647. when a party of royalists took possession of it, and from the steeple so annoyed the parliamentarians in the castle, that they could not " play the ordnance without the woolsacks before them " , and the bullets from the church " played so thick into the outward castle yard, that they could not pass from one gate to another, nor relieve the guards without very great hazard " . The church, however, was soon set on fire, and the royalist obliged to fly from its falling ruins. The present edifice has a light and airy appearance, and has a tower with one bell, at the west end. It has a spacious nave and two side aisles. the southernmost of which was much enlarged by subscription in 1756; and a similar extension of the north aisle took place in 1733, when £500 was raised for the purpose. It has since been new paved and ornamented with a handsome pulpit and a reading desk, and also with a new gallery on the north side. The organ was erected in 1811. On each side of the communion table are elegant paintings representing the Good Samaritan and the Prodigal Son, and the walls are decorated with many neat monumental tablets, and four hatchments belonging to the families of Newdigate, Smith, Bromley and Cooper. The living is a Rectory, valued in the King's books at £2 1s 8d, now £216. It is, like Saint Peter's, nominally in the patronage of the crown, but virtually in the gift of the Lord Chancellor. The Rev. William Joseph Butler M.A. is the incumbent.

White's Directory of Nottinghamshire 1853. 
Family F907
 
107

Nov 5 1654 (Final Concord?) From Nicholls

By the concurrence ( so my memorandum expresses it) of Frances Wace, Widow and executrix of Thomas Wace late of Rotherby, Gent Deceased , Samson Wace his Son and Heir and Anne, Catherine and Emme his daughters, in consideration of £120 the capital Messuage in Rotherby in the Tenure of the Waces , the close adjoining and three and one half yardlands in the fields of Rotherby were sold to Sir Thomas Hartopp of Burton Lazars Knight and his Heirs. This Lordship has since been enclosed but by whom and at what time I have not been informed...............................CARTE.MS

(this must have been a form of recovery in order that Frances could dispose of her son?s inheritance in his name Samson being a minor) 
UNKNOWN, Frances (I6737)
 
108

On 10th January 1623, an agreement was signed between:

Richard Chamberlayne of Astley, in the County of Warwick, Esquire, of the one part, and Edward Bulstrode of the Inner Temple, London, Esquire, Margaret Bulstrode, wife of the said Edward (and daughter of the said Richard) and Richard Bulstrode, son of the said Edward and Margaret, of the other part, whereby, in consideration of the sum of one hundred and fifty pounds of good and lawful money of England,

Edward purchased, on a 99 years lease, a dwelling house and an estate,
Lying and Being in the Several Parishes of Astley, aforesaid, and Bedworth in the said County of Warwick.

The estate comprised :
one Messuage or Tenement Anciently called Emeries and divers Closures, Crofts, Parcels of Land, Pastures, Meadows, Coppice and Groves with the said Messuage or Tenement used or unto the same belonging and appertaining. All with parcels and known by the several names of the Longcroft, the Middlecroft, the Pear tree Piece, the Croyfield the Leafield, the Soleyfield, the Middlefield, Stanhurst Meadows, one little Coppice or Grove called Lacock Grove, the Spring Lees, the Cow Lees pasture or the over Cow Lees, the Nether Cow Lees, one other little Coppice or Grove called the Cow Lees Grove, the Cow Lees Close, or pasture, lying and abutting next unto and upon the Spring Lees at the one end, and the over Cow Lees, at the other end, with all and singular Houses, Barns, Gardens, Orchards, Lands, Meadows, Feeding Pastures, Crofts, Groves, woods, underwoods and commons and all other the appurtenances whatsoever to the said Messuage or tenement belonging or therewith used or occupied .?? This estate, lying midway between Astley church and Bedworth church, was part and parcel of the Marriage portion of the said Margaret and for the better preferment and advancement of the said Margaret in her said marriage and for divers other good causes and considerations. 
Family F820
 
109

on 7 Oct 1796 John Salt was a witness to the marriage of Catherine Knight and William Harris at Sibson 
Salt, John (I5699)
 
110

One of the earliest records is of Ralph de Bolestrode of Buckinghamshire in 1194-5 Among his successors was Thomas, who, in 1291, held Bulstrode in the Manor of King's Langley a tenement and a caracute of land, which, on his death in 1349-50, passed to Nicholas, his son and heir. Thomas, in 1264, and Nicholas, in 1340 and 1349, in the reign of Edward III, witnessed deeds relating to grants and exchanges of land in Langley. In 1337-8, Thomas's son Edmund and Edmund's wife Maud, conveyed a messuage and 160 acres of land in Langley to Payn de Mohun.

In 1362, Edmund and Maud's son, Edmund, was in the retinue of one John de Stretle, going to Gascony, which, under the Treaty of Bretigni of 1360, was one of the French territories assigned to England during the Hundred Years War. It was said that the French speaking English King and his nobles at that time felt more at home in Gascony than they did in neighbouring Scotland.

Geoffrey de Bulstrode, Lord of the Manor of Hedgerley, Bucks. (later to become known as Hedgerley-Bulstrode) acquired the Manor of Chalfont by marrying Agnes Goys, heiress of the wealthy Goys family. Geoffrey's interests and activities were many and varied. In 1313, as Keeper of the Manor of Fordington in Dorset, he was required to expend up to 100/- in repairing the King's house in the manor and to take for this purpose twelve oaks fit for timber from the wood of the manor. At the same time, timber was being felled in the woods of Bulstrode manor for divers operations at Windsor Castle.

Between 1313 and 1330 there are many references to Geoffrey's possessions in Buckinghamshire and elsewhere (messuages, watermills, grazing lands, meadows and woods) recorded in the Calendar of Close Rolls and the Feet of Fines, the latter described by the Public Record Office as the records of fictitious law suits, entered into in order to avoid regulations restricting the conveyance of land. The intending purchaser, as plaintiff claimed the property from the vendor, thereby enabling the " vendor's " possession of the land to be officially documented.

Geoffrey does not always appear to have observed the niceties of the law and, unfortunately, was involved in several protracted disputes concerning his estates, including one, in 1331, with the Abbess of Burnham, who was granted part of Bulstrode manor. In 1335, there was an enquiry initiated by Edward III and the Abbess about the Manor of Bulstrode and questions were raised about land and tenements in Chalfont St. Peter. However, Geoffrey still held the manor in 1361 and, in the meantime, had become Member of Parliament for Dorchester. 
Boulstrode, John (I2023)
 
111

Philip Garston - Jones was an Actor at Wolverhampton Rep at the time. He later became Jack Woolley in the Archer's a BBC radio soap. 
Family F1265
 
112

Rotherby - LEI ENG
OS Grid Reference: 52°45'N 1°00'W
Name Origin: Old Norse Redebi Hreiðar's village or homestead.

Domesday Book:
LAND OF EARL HUGH
In GUTHLAXTON Wapentake
Earl Hugh holds Barrow from the King. 15 carucates of land. In lordship he has 4½ ploughs; 2 male with 1 female slaves. 40 villagers with 13 smallholders have 11 ploughs. 3 mills at 30s; woodland 1 league long and 4 furlongs wide which pays 5s.
Earl Harold held this manor with the dependencies written below.:-
In Donington 5 carucates of land. Meadow 3 furlongs long and 1 furlong wide.
In Cossington 6 carucates of land.
In Hoton 6 carucates of land.
In Seagrave 2 carucates of land. Meadow, 10 acres.
In Sileby 1 carucate of land.
In Rearsby 2 carucates of land less 1 bovate. Meadow 8 acres.
In Brooksby 2 carucates of land. Meadow 7 acres, A mill 5s.
In Frisby 1½ carucates of land. Meadow 4 acres.
In Prestwold 2 carucates of land. Meadow 3 furlongs long and 1 furlong wide; woodland 6 furlongs long and 5 furlongs wide.
In Charley 4 carucates of land. Waste.
In Gaddesby 1 carucate of land. Meadow, 4 actres; a mill, 3 s.
In REDEBI 3 carucates of land less 2 bovates. Meadow, 3 acres.
In Frisby 1½ carucates of land. Meadow, 4 acres; a mill, 28d.
4 of the Earl's men-at-arms hold 12 carucates of land from these lands. In these the Earl himself has in lordship 4½ ploughs and 30 Freemen, 25 villagers and 13 smallholders who have 15½ ploughs with 1 slave.
His men-at-arms have in lordship 3 ploughs and 12 villagers with 1 Freeman and 2 smallholders who have 3 ploughs.
********************************************************************** **
A Topographical Dictionary of England, Samuel Lewis, 1831:
ROTHERBY, a parish of 900 acres in the eastern division of the hundred of GOSCOTE, county of LEICESTER, 5½ miles (W.S.W.) from Melton-Mowbray, containing 143 inhabitants. The living is a rectory, in the archdeaconry of Leicester, and diocese of Lincoln, rated in the kings's books at £8. 8. 4., and in the patronage of the Rev. Mr. Browne. The church is dedicated to All Saints. Rotherby Hall is the seat of Samuel Seaman Esquire .
********************************************************************** **** *
Alice Bailey was the heir of John Bailey according to the heralds visitation of Leicestershire in 1619. This is undoubtedly how the Wase family came into the Rotherby property.

Lay Subsidy 1 Edward III(1327)
John Le Wardes (? Bailiff) 2d (this could be the original John Bailey)

The property is likely to have been in the hands of the family since at least 1368:-
( Hastings MSS: Sunday before Mark 42 Edward III (23 Apr 1368) John Baylif of Rotherby witness to charter between Robert of Rolleston, parson and John Barowe of Rotherby)

The name Bailey is occupational from the Old French Balif (acc.) Balli (nom),a free man, the appointed representative of an absenttee Lord of the Manor who lived in the manor house and administered the manor on behalf of his Lord. In the 13th century he would have been payed about £6 per annum as opposed to a ploughman's 8s. [ P.H.Rainey " The Origins of English Surnames]

Lay subsidy rolls :133 - 26 Poll Tax 1377
---------------------------------------------------------------------
John servant of John Baly 4d
Edward servant of John Bayly 4d
John Bayley; fermer 8d

NB fermer or farmer :- Someone who paid the Lord of The Manor a fixed sum of money in return for administering and receiving the rents, dues and profis from a manor.

As the property passed with her widowhood it seems likely that her marriage to William Hill, Merchant of the Calais Staple was without issue. It would be interesting to search for any will of William Hill, such a will if it exists, (unlikely) would fix the date of her marriage. 
Bailey, Alice (I279)
 
113

See Will of Thomas Allen (Father in Law) re request to Brother Thomas and his Daughter 
Savill, Ann (I5722)
 
114

Servant to John Dumolo Land Agent at Curdworth in 1851 
Boulstridge, Elizabeth (I1793)
 
115

Sir Richard Bulstrode
----------------------------------
A soldier, diplomatist, and author, born 1610; died 1711, was the second son of Edward Bulstrode by Margaret, daughter of Richard Ashley, chamberlain of the queen's household and member of the Inner Temple. He was educated at Pembroke College, Cambridge, and while at the university was the author of a poem on the birth of the Duke of York. At twenty-three years of age he entered the Inner Temple and in 1649, at his father's request and through his interest, was made a bencher. During the Civil War he was loyal to the king, serving in the Prince of Wales's regiment and holding at times the post of adjutant. He was later promoted to the rank of Adjutant-General of Horse, and still later to be Quartermaster-General. He was appointed to take charge of the funeral of Lord Strafford and became responsible for the expenses attending it; on being pressed by his creditors he fled to Bruges. He subsequently underwent a short term of imprisonment, which was terminated by the payment of the debt by Charles II. On his return he was appointed auditor of a Scotch regiment then serving in the Netherlands and in 1673 was appointed agent at the court of Bruges. He was temporarily recalled two years later, and on 1675 was knighted and again sent to Brussels, this time as resident, where he remained until the accession of James II when he was made envoy. When the revolution of 1688 compelled James to leave England, Bulstrode accompanied him to the court of Saint-Germain, where he remained until his death. Among his writings are: " Original Letters written to Earl of Arlinton, with an account of the Author's Life and Family " , " Life of James II " , " Memoirs and Reflections on the Reign and Government of Charles I and Charles II " and a large number of elegies and epigrams.
THOMAS GAFFNEY TAAFFEE
Transcribed by Joseph P. Thomas
From the Catholic Encyclopedia, copyright © 1913 by the Encyclopedia Press, Inc
*****************************************************************
The Dictionary of National Biography wrongly records Sir Richard's mother, Margaret, as the daughter of Richard Astley, chamberlain of the Queen's household and that Sir Richard was born in 1610. He himself wrote that he was born in the year 1617 - 7 years before James the first dyed. James I died on 27th March 1624. Add. MSS 3885 f129 1689
******************************************************************
Unlike his father and most other members of his family (several of whom were also lawyers and some members of Parliament) Richard sympathised with King Charles, joining the Royalist forces at the outbreak of the Civil War, but, in later life wrote:

" I was then very young and in a labyrinth, not knowing well which way to go, but at last I resolved to go to Whitehall [Palace] with some gentlemen of the Inner Temple, being then newly come thither from Cambridge, where I had been bred in Pembroke Hall. I was brought up to London by my father from Coventry, where we then dwelt. "

Richard was later to achieve distinction as a soldier, lawyer, diplomat and historian and to be knighted by Charles II for his services.
*****************************************************************
Further reading:-
Richard Bulstrode: Memoirs and Reflections upon the Reign and Government of King Charles I and King Charles II, containing an account of several remarkable facts not mentioned by other historians of those times wherein the character of the Royal Martyr and of Charles II are vindicated from 'fanatical aspersions.1721
*****************************************************************
Richard took part in the siege of Warwick Castle from 7th to 23rd August 1642, on which he recorded: Our endeavours for taking it were to little purpose for we only had two small pieces of cannon which were brought from Compton House, belonging to the Earl of Northampton, and those were drawn to the top of the church steeple and were discharged at the castle, to which they could do no hurt, but only frightened them within the castle, who shot into the street, and killed several of our men. This was the first Action I was ever in and, being upon an unruly Horse, he ran away with me amongst the Enemy, while we pursued them to the Bridge, in which Hurly I lost my Hat.

Richard, who served in the Prince of Wales Regiment of Horse, wrote: I was engaged in all the wars with King Charles the first and received a terrible wound from a pole axe in my head at Edge Hill which was the first great battle between the King and his rebellious subjects which was fought on 23rd October 1642.
******************************************************************* 
Bulstrode, Sir Richard (I2290)
 
116

The children of Thomas and Rebecca Bulstrode have been entered un various spellings and this is the first instance of the use of Boulstridge and Bolstridge.
********************************************************************** ***
At Present no link has been found to connect Thomas (and Rebecka) and Francis (and Jane Ashmore) to Edward and Margaret Bulstrode the evidence of a connection is purely circumstantial.
The Bedworth Registers clearly show a link between the Bulstrode and Bolstridge surnames. There are no other compulsory records that list a Bulstrode in the area except Sir William Bulstrode who died at Coventry, without issue, in 1646 and in his Will he made bequests to friends and to Edward Bulstrode (of Sole End) son of his kinsman Edward Bulstrode.
In 1774 a freeholder is listed at Bedworth Woodlands in the Warwickshire poll book called Francis Bolstridge.
********************************************************************** ***
Examining the Bedworth registers we find the following :
William Bulstrode born 12 May, bapt. 5 June 1655
Thomas Bulstrode bapt. 14 July 1657 (this was written in at a later stage )
1659-1661 no register entries
Francis Bolstrod bapt. 1 July 1661(squeezed in at top of page out of order and in different hand)
1662 - April 1663 few entries at all register quite disorganized.
1663 Register in new hand and back no normal.
James Bolstridge Bapt. 2 May 1669
Samuel Bulstrodg Bapt. 5 May 1672
Jone Bulstrog Bapt. 21 Jan 1676
From 1678 - 1681 there are 4 entries of Bulstrod until Thomas son of Thomas junior reverts to Bolstridge on March 19th
All further entries at Bedworth then are either Bulstrodg(e) Bolstrig(e) or Boulstridg(e)
********************************************************************** **** 
Bulstrode, Thomas (I2301)
 
117

The John Hough who was a Witness was the same John who married her sister Ann 
Family F1970
 
118

The Lymbery Family were substantial employers in the Nottingham Lace Industry 
Lymbery, Percy Arthur Roe (I4662)
 
119

The marriage of Ann Bickley and Thomas Tunkes has not been found as yet. This information is from the IGI and is a submitted entry. The hearth tax returns do however place the Bickley and Tunks families in adjacent properties. Research here is in it's Infancy.

The Tunkes of Sutton Coldfield are mainly from the Canwell Hall area right on the parish boundary less than a mile from both Kingsbury and Tamworth Parishes. 
Tunkes, Thomas (I6622)
 
120

The marriage of Samuel has been fixed with Mary Fleming for the following reasons.
She Matches the 1851 census information as Samuel's wife.
A Mary Fleming and Samuel Spencer witnessed the marriage of Samuels Sister Catherine 
Spencer, Samuel (I5950)
 
121

The Parish
St. Mary's parish is the largest of the three parochal divisions of the town, and county of the town of Nottingham, as it contains about four-fifths of the buildings and population, and the whole of the forest and burgess lands. It includes all the buildings and land on the south side of the Leen, betwixt the Trent and the parishes of Sneinton and Lenton, and all that part of the town on the north side of the Leen, lying east of Sussex Street, Middle Hill, Market Street and Fletchergate; whence the boundary turns westward, and includes all the buildings north of Bottle Lane, Poultry, Timber Hill, Beastmarket Hill, Chapel Bar and the Park, until it joins the parish of Radford. Its principal streets are the High Pavement, St. Mary's Gate, Stoney Street, Carlton Stret, George Street, Pelham Street, Clumber Street, Parliament Street, Derby Road and Mansfield Road. Its most important public buildings consist of the Exchange, the Post Office, the Town Hall, the churches of St. Mary, St. Paul, Trinity and St. John; St. Barnabas Catholic Church, Wesleyan Chapel, and many other dissenting places of worship; the Dispensary, the Theatre, the Grammar, National, Lancasterian and British Schools; Town Gaol and House of Correction &c.&c. The County Hall and Prison are within the boundary, but the ground on which they stand is exempted from the jurisdiction of the town, by a charter of Henry VI.

The Church
St. Mary, the largest of the three parish churches in Nottingham, is a venerable edifice, in the collegiate style in the form of a cross, with a very august tower. It is on the north side of High Pavement, upon a bold eminence, which rises nearly 100 feet above the River Leen, so that it presents a commanding appearance to the spectator in almost every direction. It has evidently been built in the Gothic style, which prevailed in the reign of Henry VII, and Leland, who visited it about 1540, describes it as being " newe and uniforme yn worke " . Its interior dimensions are from east to west, 216 feet, from south to north at the transcepts, 97 feet, in the nave, 67 feet, and in the chancel 29 feet. In 1726, the west end was rebuilt in the Doric order, and the south wall of the nave was new faced in 1761, since which many other parts of the walls have been renewed. Much of the stone used in its frequent repairs is of a very soft and perishable freestone, so that many of the modern parts now present an air of antiquity. In the steeple is an excellent peal of ten musical bells, all cast between the years 1605 and 1761. many of the monumens, and all the brass plates in the church were destroyed by the liberal Roundheads in the civil commotions of the seventeenth century. In the south aisle is " Our Lady's Chapel " , which contains the tombs of the first and second Earls of Clare, over which is a mutilated alabaster figure. On the opposite side is the Chapel of All Saints, where many of the ancient family of Plumptre are interred; and on one of their tombs lies the recumbent figure of a man dressed in a gown with wide sleeves. The Earl of meath and several other distinguished figures lie interred in the church, as is recorded on many mural monuments, several of which belong to the family of Wright. In the north window is a beautiful figure of St. Andrew.

White's Directory of Nottinghamshire 1853. 
Family F1781
 
122

The Thomas Bolstredge who witnessed this Marriage signed in a fine hand 
Family F477
 
123

There could well have been another marriage between these two :-
John Hugh married Mary Garridge at Ratcliffe Culey on 24 Nov 1774
Mary Hough was buried on 26 Aug 1800 
Family F1933
 
124

There were a large number of burials this winter 
Bolstridge, Jane (I1036)
 
125

Thirza's parents? clearly from her birth cert her mother is Susan
Nicholls, but from the two subsequent marriages her father is named as
Thomas Bailey Nicholls & Thomas Baley Nicholls, a groom. In the 1881 census
Susan Nicholls she is really Susanna, is living at 1 Calthorpe Street,
Banbury 45 a shopkeeper unmarried. There were also lodgers at the same
address but Susan is shown as head. My cousin says that not far from the
above is a Thomas Bailey age 45 a coachman also unmarried and the guess is
that he is the father. 
Nicholls, Susanna (I5005)
 
126

This information from the IGI to be checked 
Bolstridge, Elizabeth (I834)
 
127

This John could be in fact John Quaker and Locksmith if the will took many years to prove as the only evidence of his death is the will. 
Gulliver, John (I3565)
 
128

This link is almost certainly correct Although there is a 5 year difference between D.O.B calculated from headstone and that of baptism. 
Gulliver, Thomas (I3627)
 
129

Un -married with parents in 1891 census 
Bolstridge, Louisa (I1165)
 
130

Visitation of Buckinghamshire P 148 additional Pedigrees

Thomas Bullstrode of Bradborough parke in cob. Bedford=
Joan da. of Austin Bellson of Astonvant in Com oxford esquire son and heir of Wm Belson of Brill in Com Buck esqu & Marg dau Rich. Scarning of Mesy Hampton & ... in Com Gloucester Remarried to

= ? Allen 2nd Hus (IGI=Tho Allen in 1571)

= Doges (Douglas) 3 Husb of Long Ringdon

= William Dautrey 4 Husb of London 
Family F237
 
131

Widow and Widower 
Family F1911
 
132

WILL OF THOMAS WAZE

Will of Thomas Waze, of Hickling, Nottinghamshire, 1645

I, Thomas Waze of Hickling in the County of Nottingham, gentleman, being weak of body but of perfect memory, praised be God therefore, do make and ordain this my last will and testament in manner and form following.
First I give and bequeth unto Jane Waze the elder (sworn), my loving wife, as long as she keep her (illegible ) name, all my lands, goods and tenements during her widowhood; but in case that she marries again my will is that Thomas Waze my eldest son shall have and enrty of one oxgang of the said land, so soon (illegible) change my name: and furthermore, my will is that I give to Thomas Waze, my son, after the decease of me and Jane Waze, his mother, all that mesuage, house or tenement with one close or croft and also two oxgangs of arible land, meadow and pasture with all profits and comoities whatsoever thereunto belonging to the said Thomas Waze and his heirs male for ever; and also my will is that Thomas Waze, my eldest son so soon as he shall come to all his lands, shall pay to Samson Waze, my second son, five pounds, to Katherine Waze 5 pounds and to Jane Waze the younger five pounds, within twelve months after the decease of Jane Waze, now my wife; and also my will is thet if Thomas do die without male heirs, then all the lands and tenements shall descend to Sampson Waze and his heirs male and for want of such issue then to John Waze my youngest son, to him and his heirs forever paying the afoersaid portions to the said persons if they be then living; and furthermore my will is that if any of those my children shall depart this life before the said portions be due and payable then it shall remain equally to the rest of the children who shall be then living.
In witness whereof I have hereafter set my hand the eight day of April A.D. 1645

Thomas Waze

[In the left margin] John C...inton (?) sworn, Edward Daxter, Witnesses

Hickling is located 8 1/4 miles NW of Melton Mowbray. Population in 1831 was 529.
Hickling

Hickling is a large village and parish on the Grantham Canal, at the foot of the Wolds, near the Leicestershire border and the Vale of Belvoir, 12 miles south-east of Nottingham and 8 miles south by west of Bingham.

The parish is called in Doomsday Book Eeheling and Hegeling, and was partly soc to Cropwell and Granby. In contains 613 inhabitants and 2,663 acres of land, of the rateable value of £3,014 8s, which was enclosed in 1776, when 431a 0r 4p were allotted in lieu of tithes, in addition to 62a 0r 4p of ancient glebe. The principal land owners are the Dean and Chapter of Lincoln, Mr Marshall, Mr Collishaw, Mr Eaton, Mr Robert Hardyard and Mr Mason, and several other freeholders, but Earl Manvers is the lord paramount.

The parish church is dedicated to St. Luke, and has a fine lofty tower with four bells and a clock. A stone coffin, bearing a Runic inscription, was found some years ago under the chancel. The living is a rectory, valued in the King's books at £18 8s 4d, now £600, and is in the patronage of Queen's College, Cambridge, to which it was given in 1676 by the widow of Dr Bardsey. Five small benefactions producing 25s yearly have been left to the poor of this parish, by Robert and William Mann, Richard Smith, William Marriott and John Faulkes.

White's Directory of Nottinghamshire 1853 
Wase, Thomas (I7061)
 
133

Will probated 16 Oct 1749, son George executor. 
Allen, Silas (I150)
 
134

WILL: Extracts from Will of Silas Allen, South Croxton, 1762
" Silas Allen, Yeoman of South Croxton, 1762
Wife Elizabeth, Mother Benett Allen, Brothers George, Paul, William &
Thomas. Witnesses Hannah Freeman, John Barsby, Thomas Allen. Probate
21-1-1764 to Wife Elizabeth. " 
Allen, Silas (I152)
 
135

William Randall = Mary Hartop
Wit Thomas X Randall and John Darlison
23 june 1823 
Family F1670
 
136

Witness by Licence b and sp 
Family F1164
 
137

Witnesses included Sus. Brotherhood who married John Parsons here in 1862 
Family F1065
 
138

Wymondham (Population 507)
Wymondham acts as a rural service centre six miles east of Melton Mowbray. For centuries, weekly markets were held in the Main Street, and an annual fair was granted in 1303. The street plan indicates that it was probably once a far larger village or small town. In the 18th century, Roman remains were found in the form of a pavement and other relics. The Parish Church of St. Peter on the south side of the village has a 13th century chancel, fine east window and monuments to the Berkeley family, Lords of the Manor until 1630. A " Free School " adjoining the churchyard, built in the 1670s as a Grammar School, was renovated in 1885 for use as a reading room. The replacement Grammar School is just west of the village. The Paulet family in Wymondham manufactured Stilton cheese and supplied it to the Bell Inn at Stilton on the Great North Road. This is how the cheese is thought to have derived its name. On a hillside to the north is a six sail tower windmill. The windmill is adjacent to a tea room and craft centre. In September 1999 a computer cafe offering Internet access was opened at the Sir John Sedley Centre and you can email them at sedley@itcentre.freeserve.co.uk. 
Family F260
 
139

[allen.FTW]

[Thomas Waze.GED]

BIRTH: Residing at 107 Curtis Rd. Balmain Nth.,Sydney. Certificate held.

DEATH: Caused by Cardiac failure (12 hrs.) Bronchial Asthma (21 days)
Certificate held.

RESIDED AT: " Arcadia " Searle St., Ryde, until Abt 1922
Victoria Rd.,Ryde. Then called Great North Rd.
85 Champion Rd., Tennyson.
86 Champion Rd., Tennyson (when Allen born).
95 Argyle St., Paramatta (when Gordon born).
42 Sunnyside St., Gladesville.
College St., Ryde.
Abbey St., Gladesville.
25 Woniora Rd., Hurstville. 
Allen, Doris Evelyn (I60)
 
140

[allen.FTW]

[Thomas Waze.GED]

DEATH: Cause of death- Septicaemia aged 34. Copy of Death Certificate
held. Lived at " Acadia'' Searle St., Ryde at time of death.

BIRTH: Certificate held. No Father named.

The Benevolent Asylum was located at the corner of Pitt & Devonshire Sts. Surrey Hills & was built in 1820. The present location of Central railway Station. The Asylum sheltered the aged poor until 1862, but continued thereafter to take in the afflicted poor, destitute children and maternity cases. ( 'SC on the Benevelent Society', NSW V&P, LA, 1861-62, Vol 2, p.930.) 
Cotterill, Evelyn May (I2711)
 
141

[allen.FTW]

[Thomas Waze.GED]

DEATH: Caused by cancer of the abdomen. At age 64.

RESIDENCES: Born at New St. Melton Mowbray. Died at 49 Rosser St. Balmain Sth.
Lived at Dillon's Bay (late1872)and Elizabeth Bay (early 1873), Erromanga, Vanuatu.
Lived at 2 Glasgow Terrace, (nos.57,59,61 & 63) MacQuarie St..South (now Commonwealth St.) (see " Surry Hills " , the City's Backyard by Christopher Keating) when Walter Brett Jnr. was born (14 Sep. 1874), and 31 Hutchinson St., Surry Hills when Sydney John was born (3 Nov. 1883).

OCCUPATIONS: Cook-Steward on Missionary Barque " Dayspring " (1871)- managed a Cotton plantation at Vanuatu (1873) - Chief Cook at Sydney Temperance Hall (1878-1893).

GENERAL NOTES: The Dayspring first arrived, from where she built in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, at Sydney, on about 14th Jan. 1865, after settling the Gordons, McCullaghs and the Morissons on their several stations in the islands. Captain Fraser was likely the Captain in command. The journey had taken 14 months. (left Halifax Oct 1863).

The Dayspring arrived at Portland, Victoria, 21 April 1871 from Belfast (Port Fairy). Atkinson's Plan of the Special Survey 1850, Port Fairy, including the Township of Belfast, shows the Moyne River flowing into the Belfast Lough.

The Dayspring left Portland on 22 April 1871 with the following passengers- Dr Geddie, Mrs Paton & 3 children, & a white servant ( may be Elizabeth Ann). Arrived New Hebrides (Vanuatu) 17 May 1871. See full file on Vanuatu etc. etc. Was given a grant of land by a native chief. Copy held by Donald Allen.

Walter and Elizabeth were married on board the Paragon on 13th Dec. 1871. Walter was a member of the crew.

Schooner Paragon (renamed Dayspring) 159 Tons, left New Hebrides to Sydney 29 September 1873
Benjamin Jenkins Master, Walter Allen Cook & Steward (aged 26 born Melton) Rev J.E. Paton, Mrs Paton & 4 children, & servant, Rev. J. Copeland, Mrs Copeland, & 3 children, Rev J. Goodwill, Mrs Goodwill, & 32 children, Mrs Allarn.

Log of Logs Vol 2
1874 ML Sydney - D388 includes Custom's permit to bring Missionary Barque from Aneitum (Vanuatu) to Sydney for Registration March 1874, as well as Declaration re ownership of wreck of Dayspring 18-3-1874. (returned to Vanuatu 18 Aug. 1874)

NOTE The ship Paragon was built in Balmain, launched in January 1873 & later renamed Dayspring 2.

FUTURE RESEARCH: Would like to know when & how Walter first came to the area. Before Birth of Walter Brett Jnr. (10 Sept. 1874)
DEATH: Caused by cancer of the abdomen. At age 64.

RESIDENCES: Born at New St. Melton Mowbray. Died at 49 Rosser St. Balmain Sth.
Lived at Dillon's Bay (late1872)and Elizabeth Bay (early 1873), Erromanga, Vanuatu.
Lived at 2 Glasgow Terrace, (nos.57,59,61 & 63) MacQuarie St.,South (now Commonwealth St.) (see " Surry Hills " , the City's Backyard by Christopher Keating) when Walter Brett Jnr. was born (14 Sep. 1874), and 31 Hutchinson St., Surry Hills when Sydney John was born (3 Nov. 1883).

OCCUPATIONS: Cook-Steward on Missionary Barque " Dayspring " (1871)- managed a Cotton plantation at Vanuatu (1873) - Chief Cook at Sydney Temperance Hall (1878-1893).

GENERAL NOTES: The Dayspring first arrived, from where she built in Halifax, Nova Scotia, at Sydney, on about 14th Jan. 1865. The journey had taken 14 months. (left Halifax Oct 1863).

The Dayspring arrived at Portland, Victoria, 21 April 1871 from Belfast (Port Fairy) (probably very near to Portland). Atkinson's Plan of the Special Survey 1850, Port Fairy, including the Township of Belfast, shows the Moyne River flowing into the Belfast Lough.

The Dayspring left Portland on 22 April 1871 with the following passengers- Dr Geddie, Mrs Paton & 3 children, & a white servant ( may be Elizabeth Ann). Arrived New Hebrides (Vanuatu) 17 May 1871. See full file on Vanuatu etc. etc. Was given a grant of land by a native chief. Copy held by Donald Allen.

Schooner Paragon (renamed Dayspring) 159 Tons, left New Hebrides to Sydney 29 September 1873
Benjamin Jenkins Master, Walter Allen Cook & Steward (aged 26 born Melton) Rev J.E. Paton, Mrs Paton & 4 children, & servant, Rev. J. Copeland, Mrs Copeland, & 3 children, Rev J. Goodwill, Mrs Goodwill, & 32 children, Mrs Allarn

Log of Logs Vol 2
1874 ML Sydney - D388 includes Custom's permit to bring Missionary Barque from Aneitum (Vanuatu) to Sydney for Registration March 1874, as well as Declaration re ownership of wreck of Dayspring 18-3-1874. (returned to Vanuatu 18 Aug. 1874)

NOTE The ship Paragon was built in Balmain, launched in January 1873 & later renamed Dayspring 2.

FUTURE RESEARCH: Would like to know when & how Walter first came to the area. Before Birth of Walter Brett Jnr. (10 Sept. 1874) 
Allen, Walter Brett (I187)
 
142

[allen.FTW]

[Thomas Waze.GED]

DEATH: Death registered at St..Leonards No.in Register 2864.Died of a subdural
haemorrhage & contributed to by fractured ribs, the effects of injuries received
when the motor vehicle in which he was a passenger, collided with an electric
light pole beside Rooty Rd.,Eastern Creek. Inquest held on 16 April 1973 by
J.A Dunn, Coroner for New South Wales. Copy of Certificate is held.

MARRIAGE: Harold & Doris divorced. Both remarried. He may have had a child
called Lee. 
Jennings, Harold Stewart Stephen (I4404)
 
143

[allen.FTW]

[Thomas Waze.GED]

Joined US Cavalry, fought with General Custer, and killed at the Battle of Little Big Horn 25 June 1876. In Co C, 7th Regt, US Cavalry.

BIO. SKETCH FROM JOHN M. CARROLL, " THEY RODE WITH CUSTER " :

ALLAN, Fred E., Private - Company C
Killed in battle on June 25. Born in Melton. Enlisted on October 3,
1873, at age 25 in Boston, Massachusetts, by Lieutenant James Ropes. Previous
occupation was watchmaker. He had brown eyes, black hair, dark complexion and
was 5'8 in height. Listed on the battle monument as F.E. Allen and as Fred E.
Allan in the Register of Enlistments, U.S.Army.

OCCUPATIONS: Watchmaker - Private Company C, Seventh U.S. Cavalry 
Allen, Alfred Ernest (I35)
 
144 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I4402)
 
145

[allen.FTW]

[Thomas Waze.GED]

NOTE: See Will of Richard Allen (RIN 188). 
Allen, William Charles (I203)
 
146

[allen.FTW]

[Thomas Waze.GED]

NOTES: Elizabeth was a servant to the wife of the Minister,on the Dayspring, a
Mrs. Robertson. 
Jackson, Elizabeth Ann Bradford (I4354)
 
147 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I4403)
 
148

[allen.FTW]

[Thomas Waze.GED]

OCCUPATION: Plumber

MARRIAGES: Second marriage to Mildred Lillian Muncer who died 29 Jun 1954.
Remains at Nth. Suburbs Crematorium. No issue to Sydney John.

BIRTH: Resident at 31 Hutchinson St.,Surrey Hills, Sydney, when born. 
Allen, Sidney John (I148)
 
149

[allen.FTW]

[Thomas Waze.GED]

Paul Allen was a Frameworker. 
Allen, Paul (I135)
 
150

[allen.FTW]

[Thomas Waze.GED]

RESIDENCE: In Aug.1962- Mrs. C.D.Smith or Smythe 8 Avoca Rd. Turrumurra,N.S.W.
02 447 486 
Allen, Grace Elizabeth Mary (I97)
 

      «Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ... 52» Next»